Men’s Health – Treating Athlete’s Foot

18/01/2012 , by Admin 2 Comments Health

Although it’s true that some women do suffer from episodes of athlete’s foot, the affliction is arguably more a “men’s health” issue.  The burning and itching of even the most minor occurrence can have you scanning the aisles at your local drugstore for a quick cure.  But what if the most effective treatment was sitting on your kitchen counter?

Learn how ionized water can effectively treat athlete’s foot, speed up the healing time and even be used for prevention.

Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection of the skin that causes flaking, itching and burning around the toes and, in severe cases, over most of the foot’s skin.  If allowed to progress, cracking of the skin can occur which may allow a more serious infection to set in.

The most common treatments are anti-fungal sprays or creams found in most drugstores.  The condition is so common that many grocery stores also have a selection of treatments available on their “personal care” aisle.  These over-the-counter treatments can range in cost from $5 to $20 for a two to 4-week supply.

While hardly cost prohibitive, with effective elimination of athlete’s foot requiring 45 days of treatment, and reoccurrence being common – meaning repeated 45-day treatments – over time, the cost to treat the condition does add up.

Ionized Water for Athlete’s Foot

Strong ionized, acidic water has been used to quickly and effectively treat Athlete’s Foot.  If you have a good quality water ionizer at home, then chances are you have access to acidic water that is strong enough to both relieve symptoms and eliminate the fungus.

The most effective way to used ionized acidic water for treating your athlete’s foot is by soaking the affected areas at least twice a day for 15 to 20 minutes.  The oxidizing acidic water can relieve burning and itching on contact while working to eliminate the fungus.

After soaking, gently pat the area dry with a clean dry towel and then put on a clean pair of socks.  If possible, avoid putting your feet back into shoes for a little while.  Feet tend to sweat when bundled in socks and shoes and this creates moisture that encourages continued fungal growth.

You can continue to treat the area throughout the day by keeping a small bottle of strong ionized acidic water with you.  Pocket-sized spray bottles are available that allow you to treat the area with a fine mist in any place where you can slip your shoes and socks off for a couple of minutes.

Repeated treatments throughout the day can speed up healing time.  It’s as easy as slipping your shoes and socks off and spraying the affected area.  Allow your feet to air dry if possible or gently pat the area dry with a clean dry cloth before putting your shoes and socks back on.

The fine mist spray can relieve itchy flare-ups during the day.  If possible take an extra pair of socks – or two – along with you.  After spot treating the area during the day, putting on a clean, fresh pair of socks will help keep the area clean and dry, “starving out” the fungus.

Prevention

If you are prone to breakouts of athlete’s foot or if you go to a gym or pool on a regular basis – breeding grounds for the fungus – treating your feet with an ionized acidic spray before putting on your socks and shoes can kill the fungus before it has a chance to set in.  Just keep a small spray bottle in your gym bag and give your feet and toes a good “spritz” – then pat dry before putting your on your shoes and socks.

Around the house, use strong acidic ionized water to rinse your bathtub or the floor of your shower, and the floors in your bathroom.  Athlete’s foot fungus will grow anywhere there is enough moisture present if not disinfected or if no anti-fungal barrier is there to prevent it.

Clean, dry socks will go a long way to keeping athlete’s foot at bay too.  Especially in the summertime – if you’re active, keep one or two clean pairs of socks with you.  A quick spritz of ionized, acidic water and clean fresh socks during the day can help keep athlete’s foot from setting in.

 

Comments

  1. corner cave

    So, what PH of acid water should we be using for athletes foot?

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